Le regard oblique // Una mirada oblícua // A sidelong glance (by Robert Doisneau, 1948)

 

Robert Doisneau captured with his camera the oblique glances of passersby before a frame set in the window of the gallery Romi, located on the rue de Seine, Paris (France).

“Un regard oblique” (“A sidelong glance”) is a photograph from Robert Doisneau that was part of a LIFE magazine article published in 1948. In it we see a respectable middle-class marriage watching a piece of art in the window of an art gallery: the woman says to her husband the details of a canvas, of which only we can see the back but the man inattentive to observations of his wife, surreptitiously diverts his gaze to the portrait of a naked woman hanging on the wall.

In order the experiment came to fruition, Doisneau hid his Rolleiflex camera in an old chair that was inside the gallery, so he could capture the dimension that the eyes can take in a patriarchal culture in a time when state the naked body of a woman was a pornographic act.

Robert Doisneau captured with his camera the oblique glances of passersby before a frame set in the window of the gallery Romi, located on the rue de Seine, Paris (France).

“Un regard oblique” (“A sidelong glance”) is a photograph from Robert Doisneau that was part of a LIFE magazine article published in 1948. In it we see a respectable middle-class marriage watching a piece of art in the window of an art gallery: the woman says to her husband the details of a canvas, of which only we can see the back but the man inattentive to observations of his wife, surreptitiously diverts his gaze to the portrait of a naked woman hanging on the wall.

In order the experiment came to fruition, Doisneau hid his Rolleiflex camera in an old chair that was inside the gallery, so he could capture the dimension that the eyes can take in a patriarchal culture in a time when state the naked body of a woman was a pornographic act.

Robert Doisneau captured with his camera the oblique glances of passersby before a frame set in the window of the gallery Romi, located on the rue de Seine, Paris (France).

“Un regard oblique” (“A sidelong glance”) is a photograph from Robert Doisneau that was part of a LIFE magazine article published in 1948. In it we see a respectable middle-class marriage watching a piece of art in the window of an art gallery: the woman says to her husband the details of a canvas, of which only we can see the back but the man inattentive to observations of his wife, surreptitiously diverts his gaze to the portrait of a naked woman hanging on the wall.

In order the experiment came to fruition, Doisneau hid his Rolleiflex camera in an old chair that was inside the gallery, so he could capture the dimension that the eyes can take in a patriarchal culture in a time when state the naked body of a woman was a pornographic act.

Robert Doisneau captured with his camera the oblique glances of passersby before a frame set in the window of the gallery Romi, located on the rue de Seine, Paris (France).

“Un regard oblique” (“A sidelong glance”) is a photograph from Robert Doisneau that was part of a LIFE magazine article published in 1948. In it we see a respectable middle-class marriage watching a piece of art in the window of an art gallery: the woman says to her husband the details of a canvas, of which only we can see the back but the man inattentive to observations of his wife, surreptitiously diverts his gaze to the portrait of a naked woman hanging on the wall.

In order the experiment came to fruition, Doisneau hid his Rolleiflex camera in an old chair that was inside the gallery, so he could capture the dimension that the eyes can take in a patriarchal culture in a time when state the naked body of a woman was a pornographic act.

Robert Doisneau captured with his camera the oblique glances of passersby before a frame set in the window of the gallery Romi, located on the rue de Seine, Paris (France).

“Un regard oblique” (“A sidelong glance”) is a photograph from Robert Doisneau that was part of a LIFE magazine article published in 1948. In it we see a respectable middle-class marriage watching a piece of art in the window of an art gallery: the woman says to her husband the details of a canvas, of which only we can see the back but the man inattentive to observations of his wife, surreptitiously diverts his gaze to the portrait of a naked woman hanging on the wall.

In order the experiment came to fruition, Doisneau hid his Rolleiflex camera in an old chair that was inside the gallery, so he could capture the dimension that the eyes can take in a patriarchal culture in a time when state the naked body of a woman was a pornographic act.

Robert Doisneau captured with his camera the oblique glances of passersby before a frame set in the window of the gallery Romi, located on the rue de Seine, Paris (France).

“Un regard oblique” (“A sidelong glance”) is a photograph from Robert Doisneau that was part of a LIFE magazine article published in 1948. In it we see a respectable middle-class marriage watching a piece of art in the window of an art gallery: the woman says to her husband the details of a canvas, of which only we can see the back but the man inattentive to observations of his wife, surreptitiously diverts his gaze to the portrait of a naked woman hanging on the wall.

In order the experiment came to fruition, Doisneau hid his Rolleiflex camera in an old chair that was inside the gallery, so he could capture the dimension that the eyes can take in a patriarchal culture in a time when state the naked body of a woman was a pornographic act.

Bron: Le regard oblique // Una mirada oblícua // A sidelong glance (by Robert Doisneau, 1948)

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Over hermanspinhof

journalist/ writer, print, television, radio photographer
Dit bericht werd geplaatst in fotografie, geschiedenis, media. Bookmark de permalink .

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